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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 383



cenis, they advanced towards a very ftrong caftle, iituated upon a high mountain, called Chateauceaux, on the borders of Brittany, which was very well provided with men and ammunition. It was under the command of two knights from Lorraine ; one called fir Giles, and the other fir Valerian. The lords of France, on drawing near to this caftle, were of opinion to befiege it j for if they left a place of fuch ftrength behind them, it would do them mutfi harm. They therefore furrounded it, and made many affaults, particularly the Genoefe, who were eager to Ihew themfelves at the onfet, and loft .many of their men ; for thofe within made fo gallant a defence, that thefe gentlemen remained a long time before it without any fuccefs. At tyft, however, they brought fuch quantities of great beams and faggots as filled up the ditches, fo that they could get to the foot of the walls of the caftle, and attack it with greater vigour. The befieged flung down upon them ftones, hot lime, and brands of fire, notwithftanding which, their opponents advanced clofe to the walls, having fccured themfelves by means of large beams, fo that they could mine the walls under cover. Upon this the caftle was furrendered, the lives and effe&s of the garrifon being fpared. When the lords of France had thus gained the • caftle, the duke of Normandy, as commander in chief, gave it up to lord (Charles de Blois, as appertaining to him of right, who placed a garrifon there, with a fufficient force to guard it and the neigh


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