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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 406



walh their hands, for they, as well as yourfelf, have too long failed/ The king left his room, and came to the hall ; where, after he had walhed his. hands, he feafed himfelf, with his knights, at the dinner, as did the lady alfo : but the king ate very;little, and was the whole time penfive, calling his eyes, whenever he had an opportunity, towards the countefs. Such behaviour furprifed his friends ; for they were not accuftomed to it, and had never feen the like before. They imagined, therefore, that it was by reafon of the Scots having efcaped from him. The king remained at the caille the whole day, without knowing what to do with himfelf. Sometimes he remonftrated with himfelf, that honour and, loyalty forbad him to admit fuch treafon and falsehood into his heart, as to wUh to diihqnour fo virtuous a lady, and fo gallant a knight as her huiband was, and who had ever fo faithfully ferved him. At other times, his paffion was fo ftrong, that his honour and loyalty were not thought oh Thus did he pafs that day,k and a.fleeplefs night, in debating this matter in his own mind. At day-èreak he arofe, drew out his whole army, decamped, and followed the Scots, to chace them out of his kingdom. Upon taking leave of the countefs, he faid, ' My dear lady, God preferve you until I return ; and 1 intreat, that you will think well of what I have faid, and have the goodnefs to give me a different anfwer.' 4 Dear fir/ replied the countefs,β God, of his infinite goodnefs, preferve you, U 4 jm4


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