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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 17



none, and that they were quite ruined. On thii account, therefore, it would be proper for him to go thither, and he could "then fummon the count de Foix, whom he was Co anxious to fee, to meet him at Touloufe. The king, having affented to this propofal, ordered imrnenfe purveyances to be provided for him on the road he was to travel. He fignified to his uncle and aunt, the ( duke and duchefs of Burgun.dy, that, as yhe palled through their lands, ' he fhould be glad to fee their children, his coufins ; and that he would bring with him his brother of Touraine* and his uncle, of Bourbon. • This news of the king's intended vifit to Bur-gundy was highly pieafiog to the duke and duchefs. They had proclaimed a fcftival and tournament to be holden at Dijon,, and. fent inyitatiqj* to the knights and fquires of Savoy and the adjoining . countries, who made their preparations accords mgly. During the time all th^fe different arrange-ments were making for the king's; journey to Avig+ f Bethifac fuffered the punifhment of his crimes; but the duke of Berry having claimed him as his domeftic, thofe who had fwora his ruin pcrfuaded him to own he had erred in feveral articles of faith, which would caufe him to be transferred to the bifhop, and the duke could the eafier fave him. Crime often flupifies. Bcthifac was Ample enough to fall into their trap. The bifhop of Beziers had him tried, and given over to the fecular arm as an he relic and fodoaiite. This wretch was Burnt alive, which was, fays Mézeray,' a fun de.joie for ihp people whom he had horribly tormented. Hiftory does not fay whence he Sprung, but probably he was of low origin, who wanted to rife too rapidly.'—Di8ionnaire Hjjtorique. * non S


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