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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 33



that it has not been my fault, but refts folely with the knights of France.' The lord de Clary, who was prefent, marked this fpeech in his memory, and with great difficulty held his tongue, on account of having the englifh flight under his care. The countefs of St. Pol replied,—c My lord, you will leave France with much honour, having complied with the requeft of the king of France, not to proceed further in your combat ; for you would have been unable to do more contrary to his will. You cannot incur any blame in this matter; and all thofe on each fide of the fea that fhall hear it told, will give you more praife than blame : I therefore beg of you to reft fatisfied., c Lady/ faid the knight, cthat I will-do; and not give myfelf any further care or trouble about it/ . Here the converfation on this matter ended ; and other fubje&s were difcourfed on, during the day and night they remained. On the morrow, fir Piers Courteney took leave of the countefs de St. Pol, who prefented him with a handfome clafp of gold, and another to the lord de Clary, as being his companion, and becaufe the englifh knight was under his care and efcort. They left Lucen early in the morning, and took the road to Boulogne* where they lay that night, and the next day rode through Marquife to Calais. Between Boulogne and Calais there are but feven fhort leagues, and a good road; and at the diftance of two leagues from Calais you enter on the territory of Melle, Oye and Guines, which - then


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