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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 38



89 that he was in danger of his lifer they were highly, enraged againft him, and in particular fir Guy de. la Trimouille. They . declared his conduft de-y ferved at lead confiscation of his lands, and perr petual banifliment from the kingdom -of France* Others, who were his enemies,. faid he had a£ted like an infamous tr^aitor, in challenging and fight-ing a knight that had been placed under his guard, by the king and the duke of Burgundy ; that he was guilty of an unpardonable crime, and ought to fufFer death. The lord de Clary was fummoned to appear* which fummons he ' obeyed, and when brought before the king, the duke of Burgundy and the council, was fharply reprimanded, for having dared to injure a knight who had, come from foreign countries to the court of France to perform a deed of arms and gain renown, and had left that court with perfeû fatisfaâion to all, and under his fafeguard: notwithflanding which, he had on his return, at the boundary of the two kingdoms, challenged him to mortal combat, without having demanded permiffion of his fovereign, on whofe territories he was : that this was a crime deferring the fevereft punifhment, by which others might take example. The lord de Clary, on hearing this bitter re-proof, was thunderftruçk, for he thought what he had done deferved a .contrary treatment Having paufed awhile, he laid,*—cMy lords, it is indeed true that you intruded to my care fir Piers Cour* ieneyi with orders, to efcort him as far as Calai^,


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