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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 141



founding thpr pipes, clarions and trumpets, whole founds were re-echoed back; by the fea. When all were embarked, they call anchor, and remained that night at the mouth of the harbour ; but the fervants and horfes were left behind on fhore. A horfe worth fifty francs was on their embarkation fold for ten, as many of the knights and fquires were uncertain when, or if.ever they fhould return, and the keep of five horfes at Genoa was up-wards of a franc a day; they therefore, on de-parting, made of them what money they could, but it was little enough* There were about three hundred galleys to tranfport the men at arms and archers, and up-wards of one hundred veffels for the purveyances and other neceflaries. On the morrow, at day-break, they weighed anchor, and rowed coaftwife that and the fucceeding night.. The third day, they made Porto-fino, where ihey lay that night : at fun-rife, they rowed to Porto-Venere, and again caft anchor. The enfuing morning they weighed and took to the deep, putting themfelves under the prote&ion of God and St. George. When they had paffed the ifland of Elba, they encountered a violent tempeft, which drove them back by Gorgpnâ, Sardinia and Corfica, into the gulph of Lyons, a pofition always dangerous ; but they could not avoid it, for the tempeft was fo violent, that the ableft mariner could not do any thing to prevent their running the utmoft rifk of deftruûion: they waited therefore the will of God. ' . . " This 152


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