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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 216



«o7 proceed, and flood ftill, thefe ladies keeping fteadfly before them; The Genoefe crofs-bows had broughtv with them a dog, as I heard, froin beyond fea, but whence no one could tell, nor did he belong to any particular perfçn. This dog had been very ufeful to them ; for the Saracens never came to" ikirmifh, but by his noife he awakened the army, and as every one now. knew that whenever the dog barked the Saracens were come, or on their road, they prepared themfelves inftantly : in con-fequence of this, the Genoefe called him the dog of our Lady. This night, the dog was not idle,, but made a louder noife than ufual, and ran firft to tfcie main guard, which was under the command of the lord de Torcy, a Normand, and fir Henry d'Antoing. As during the night all founds are more eafily heard, the whole army was in motion, and properly prepared to receive the Saracens, who they knew were approaching. This was the fad; but the Virgin Mary and her company, having the Chriftians under their care, watched over them ; and this night they re-ceived no harm, for the Saracens were afraid to advance, and returned the way they had come* The Chriftians were more attentive to their future guards. The faracen knights and fquires, within the town, were much cad down at the fight they had feen, more efpecially thofe who were advanced near this company of ladies. While, on the other hand, the Chriftians were greatly exerting themfelves to win the place, which was cou-rageoufly defended. At this period, the weather was


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