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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 217



was exceedingly hot ; for ^ it was the month of Auguft, when the fun is in its greateft force, and that country was warmer than France/from being nearer the fun, and from the heat of the fands.. • The wines the befiegers were fupplied with from la Puglia and Calabria were fiery, and hjurtful to the conftitutions of the French, many of' whom fuffered feverely by fevers, from the heating quality of their liquors. I know not how the Cnriftians were enabled to bear the fatigues in fuch a climate, where fweet water was difficult to be had. They, however, had much refource in the wells ' they dug ; for ' there were upwards of two hundred funk, through the fands, along the fhore ; but, at times, even this water was muddy and heated. They were frequently diftrefled for provifion, for the fupply was irregular, fro ni Sicily and-the other iflands : at times they had abundance,, at other times they were in want. The healthy comforted the fick, and thofe who had provifion fliared it with fuch as had none ; for in this campaign they were all as brothers. The lord de Coucy, in particular, was beloved by every gentleman : he was kind -to all, and be-haved, hi mfelf by far more gracioufly, in all re-fpefls, than the duke of Bourbon, who was proud and haughty, and never converfed with the knights and fquires from foreign countries in the fame agreeable manner the lord de Coucy did. The duke was accuftomed to fit crofs-legged the greater part of the day before his pavilion ; and thofe who had any thing to fay to him Were, obliged. 20S


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