Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 245



v • CHAP. XXII. THE S1ECE OF AFRICA IS RAISED. THE CAUSK Of IT.—THE KNIGHTS AND SQUIRES RETURN TO THEIR OWN COUNTRIES* "^"OU have before heard, what pains the Chrif-tians took to conquer the town of Africa ; for they thought, if they fucceeded, they fhould gain great renown, and be able to withftand, during the winter, all the forces the infidels could bring againft them, until they fhould be reinforced from Europe, efpfccially by the king of France, who was young and fond of arms, and there were ftill two years to run of the truce with England : the, Chriftians had therefore laid fiege to Africa, as being the nioft convenient en-trance into Barbary. The infidels, fufpicious of fuch being their intentions, well victualled the place, and reinforced it with a new garrifon,* the better to guard it. The fiege ftill continued, although, after the before-mentioned lofs on the part of the Chriftians, ' little advantage was gained, and the men at arms were greatly difcouraged ; for thçy could not ob-tain any opportunity of changing the tirefomçnefs of their fituation, and of revenging themfelves on the enemy, Many, in confequence, began to murmur and fay,—1 We remain here in vain j for if we do nothing more effectual than fkir- mifhing, i36


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика