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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 247



thefe our fufpicions ; for the Genoefe do not con-ceal their opinions of us. Some of their talkers have faid to our men,—€ You Frenchmen are odd men at arms : when we failed from Genoa, we thought you would have conquered this town of Africa within a week or fortnight after your land* ing ; but we have been here nearly two months, and nothing has been done : by the afiauks and fkirmifhes you make, the town need not fear you thefe two y ear s ; and at the rate you go on, you will never conquer the kingdoms of Tunis, or Africa.* The Genoefe had fo frequently held this lan-guage to the varlets and others of the army, that it reached the ears of their lords, and was re* peated to the lord de Coucy, who was wife and prudent, and tb whom the whole army looked up. He confideréd a while, afcd then faid to himfelf,—4 The converfations of thefe Genoefe are but too well founded in truth : to put a flop to them, a full affembly of the principal knights muft be held, to coitfider how we are to proceed, for winter is faft approaching/ At this touncil, which was held in the duke of Bourbon's tent, va-rious plans were propofed ; but the conclufion •was, that they would, for this feafon, break up the fiege, and every perfon fhould return home the way he had come. The chief lords fecretly made preparations accordingly, and, calling to them the mailers of the galleys* and other veffels, acquainted them with their intentions. The cap* tains were much furprifed, and faid,—1 My lords, do 338


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