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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 277



tàvmcil, ' with ^hom he converfed ' on tbip fubjcâr, replied,—c.Sir, thefe are free companions, and part of thofe pillagers who have fo long harafled France : they do not require pay, but to feek adventures, and run the chance of gain from plundering the country* J In order to deliver France from them, after the furrender of their ftrong holds, the count, d'Annagnac leads them hither. The duke of Berry and the dauphin of Auvergne, wbofe lands they had foreiy oppreffed, treated with them by meate of the count d'Armagnac, who offered the king of France and the above mentioned lords to engage them in his quarrel with you. By dint of money he purchafed their forts; and the king of France granted them a free pardon for all their pad deeds, on condition they joined the count d'Ar-magnac; and whatever they could conquer in thefe countries was to be their own. ' They therefore aJk no pay; and there are among them men at arms that have five or fix horfes, who, if in their own country, would be conftrained to go on, foot like abfolute paupers. - They adventure themfelves boldly, and it is hazardous to engage with them, for they are all of determined courage. The beft advice we can give- is, that you guard well your cities* and principal town?, which are ftrongly garrifQned and well provided with all things ; for they have no artillery, nor any machines for car-rying on a fiege worth thinking of. They will advance to the barriers of your towns .to fkirmifh and, do gatyanj deeds of arms; but they will not |4in any thing you may regret; if qnç may judge -, by I


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