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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 281



played only Ms pennon, and was attended by m nunc than one hundred men; for he did not ex-peâ to meet with greater oppofition than ufual, and advanced at a flow pace towards the barriers. True it is, that fome few men at arins followed him by degrees ; but others faid,—* What fignifies arming? and why fhould we give ourfelves fo much trouble, when we cannot meet with any one at the barriers worth fighting with? They ftaid therefore, within their camp, eating and drinking. The count d'Armagnac, on coming to the bar-riers, began to overthrow and beat down many of thofe polled there to receive him, as good men at arms know how to do ; but the townftnen did not wait long, before they began to retreat flowly to-* wards the ambufcade. When fir James de la Berme faw it was time, he fallied forth out of the ambufh, and the Armag-nacs were furrounded and attacked on all fides. They valiantly defended themfelves, and were re-inforced by little and little with men from the camp. Many gallant deeds were done this day, which was the feaft of St. James and St. Chrifto-pher. It was fo very hot, that thofe who bore arms thought they were in an oven, for there was not any wind; and the young men at arms were overpowere4 by the heat, and unable to exert themfelves. Add to this, that the force of the lord de Milan was three to one of the Armag-nacs. The duff oppref&d them fo much, they could HOI fee each other ; but the Armagnacs, in tM% fijfferei 272


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