Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 322



SIS, made us Is caufed by your love of jufKce; but our commiflion does not extend to annihilate the bargains which may have been made between the king of France and the count de Foix. How-ever, from confideration and love to you, and for the faosfaftion of all parties, we will not proceed further in the bufinefs, if you will undertake a journey to Paris, and make to the king and council what remonftrances you may pleafe relative to it. If you can by your eloquence prevail, that the fucceflion of Foix devolve to the vifcount de Châ« teau-bon, who is indeed, as you fay, the legal heir, we fhall be right glad, for we are nq way inclined to difinherit him? c My Jords,' replied fir Roger, * you make me very happy by what you fay: remain, therefore, and amufe yourfelves in Touloufe during my abfence, for all your ex* penfes fhall be defrayed from the treafure in the caftle of Orthès/ . Thus did fir Roger d'Efpaign manage the mat-ter, during his ftay of two days in Touloufe with the commiffioners from France: a better nego-tiator could not have been fent. On the third morning, when taking leave of them, he faid,— ' iVfy lords, fince I have begun this bufinefs, I fee the neceffity for my going to Paris, to bring it to a conclufion, but J know not in what difpofirion I ihall find the king and his court. Should I ftay longer than I. propofe, I beg you will not be un^ eafy, for it will be the fault of thofe with whom I muft treat, if I do not very fpeedily return: in


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика