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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 341



and daughter*, who will fucceed to my pofleffions* Secondly, he bears the ermines, which are the arms of Brittany, and he had formerly renounced the name, arms, and all things- thereto appertain-ing. True it is, that fir Oliver de Cliffon fup-ports him in this conduâ:, to vex me ; and, as long as this fhall continue, I will not liften to any treaty of peace or friendfhip with the king. I f|iall not make war againft him, for he is my natural lord, but if, through envious or'malevo-lent informations, he make war on me, 1 will de-fend myfelf, and fhall be found ready on my own territories. All that I have now faid, I wifh the king to be made acquainted with. Such was the bitternefs with which thefe ne-gotiations were carried on between the king of France and the duke of Brittany. The duke was mafter of his council, but the king was led by fir Oliver de Cliffon, the bègue dé Villaines, fir John le Mercier and fir William de Montagu. The duke of Burgundy, who faw more clearly into this matter, was uneafy that the duke's reafons were made public, though he fupported them privately as much as he could, in which he was affifted by the duke of Berry, who hated the con-fidential advifers of the king. By their means, his treafurer, Bethifac, had fuffered an ignominious death at Beziers, which he was forced to put up with, for it was not yet time to revenge himfelf. In this ftate did they remain at Tours for up-wards of three months, without any progrefs being made in the treaties. They were on the point of eing 332


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