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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 376



% what his real intentions were. He had advanced to the caufeway, near the place of St. Catherine,, where he and his people lay hid, waiting for the* conftable to pafs. As foon as the conftable had left the ftreet of St. Pol, and turned into the fquare of the great ftreet, advancing a foot's pace, with a torch on each fide to light him, he began à converfation. with one of his fquires, faying,—41 am to have at dinner, to-morrow, my lord of Touraine, the lord de Couçy, fir John de Vienne, fir Charles d'Angers, the baron dlvry and fe-verai more : be fure take care they have all things comfortable, and let nothing be fpared/ As he faid this, fir Peter de Craon and his company ad-* vanced, and, without faying a word, fell on the conftable's attendants and extinguifhed the torches. The conftable, hearing the clatter of the horfes behind him,, thought it was the duke of Touraine who was playing him a trick, and cried out,— 'My lord, by my faith, this is very ill done; but "I e*cufe it, for yon are fo young you make a joke of every thing.' At thefe words, fir Peter de Craon, drawing his fword from the fcabbard, faid, —f Death, death ! Cliffon, you muft die/ c Who art thou,' faid Cliffon, * that utterefl fuch wordsj' 1 I am Peter de Çraon, thy enemy, whom • thou, haft fo often angered, and thou fhak now pay fqr if/ Then, calling to his people, he faid,—c Ad-vance, advance ! i have found him I was in fearch of, and whom I have long wanted to feize/ He then ftrnak him feveral blows, and his men, draw--hk$ their fwords, fell on him. Sir Oliver was . quite


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