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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 382



conftable. You cannot do us a more agreeable fervice than to take him and bring him before lis/ The provoft replied ; * Sire, I will do every thing in my power; but what road do you fuppofe be may have taken?' * Inquire, and make good dili-gence/ faid the king. At that time, tfye four principal gates of Paris were always ôpétoPwght and day: this regulation had been obferved £pm' thetime the king returned from Flanders, alter Ôe-featkig the Flemings at the battle of Rofebecqùe,* and when the Parifians, fhewing fymptonis of* re-bellion, had their mallets taken from them; It* order the more eafily to chaftife the Parifians, fir Oliver de Cliffon had advifed ' the chains to be taken from acrofs the ftreêts, and the gates oif their hinges, which had been done; and the gÉef had been, for thefe laft ten years, lying againft thé walls, fo that any one might enter, or go out of Parié, at all hours. Now, ofeferve how the feafofts repay, fir Oliver reaped what he had fown himfelf : had the gates and chains remained, fir Peter de Craon would not have dared to commit this'out-rage, for he could never have got out of Paris, but, knowing he could fet off at any hour, he was encouraged thus to difgrace himfelf. When he left the conftable, he concludsd he was dead, or at lèaft that he would never recover; but it was not ïb, a9 you have heard, to his great mortificatioh. Hé quitted Paris by St. Anthony's gate, about oiii o'clock in the morning, and, as feme fay, crpfled the Seine at the bridge of Charenton, and con-tinued his road to Chartres} but* according to B b 3 . others, % 373 .


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