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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.10
page 383



others, after going out of Paris, he returned by the gate of St. Honoré, under Montmartre, and croffed the Seine at Ponthon*. Whichever way he pafled the river, he arrived ,at Chartres at eight o'clçck in the morning, with fome of the beft mounted of his accomplices. All did not follow, but took different routes, and in fmall companies, to avoid being taken in the purfuit. On his way to Paris, he had ordered twenty horfes to bp in waiting for him, at the hoyfe of a capon, who was his friend, and had ferved him ; but it would have been better for him never to have known him, although the canon was ignorant of the crime he had committed. Sir Peter de Çraon, on Us arrival at Chartres, drank fome wine, and changed horfes, and then inftantly departed, taking the road for Maine. He continued his journey, until he can)* to a ftrong caftle he (till poffefled, called Sablé, where he flopped and re* freflied fiimfelf, and faid he would not go further, but wait there until he heard fome intelligence of the conftable. ? On the Friday, the day following this aflâffin* ation, it was all the news of Paris, and every one greatly blamed fir Peter de Craon. The lord de Coucy was no fooner informed of it, than he mounted his horfe, attended by only iêven perfons, and rode to the conftablç's hotel, behind the Tem-ple, whither be had been carried; for they mu* tually loved each other, (tiling themfelves bro* t fctot^on, Q. Pontdife, / x thcra 374


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