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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 30



Touloufc, and this was one j for he had prefctitcd the whole to the* king, who had given three to the duke of Orleans, and the fame number to the duke of Burgundy. As they were thus riding, the pages, who were but children, grew negligent of themfelves and their horfes ; and the one who bore the lance fell afleep, and, forgetful of what he had in his hand, let it fall on the cafque of the page before him* which made both the lance and cafque ring loudly. The king, being fo near, (the pages rode almoft on the heels of his horfe,) was ftartled and fhuddered ; for he had in his mind the words the wife man or fool had fpoken when he feized his hôrfë's reins, in the foreft of Mans, and fancied a hoft of enemies were come to flay him,. In this diftradion of mind, he drew his fword* and advanced on the pages, for his fcnfes were quite gone, and imagined himfelf furrounded by enemies, giving blows of his fword, indifferent on whom they fell, and bawled out, * Advance ! advance on thefe traitors/ The pages, feeing the king thus wroth, took care of themfelves, for they imagined they had angered him by their neg-ligence, and fpurred their horfes different ways. The duke of Orleans was not fer diftant from the king, who made up to him with his drawn fword, for at that moment his frenzy had deprived him of the means of knowing either his brother or uncles. The duke of Orleans,^ feeing Jiim approach with his naked fword, grew alarmed, and, fpur-ring his horfe, made off and the king after him, The duke of Burgundy, hearing the cries of the pages.,


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