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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 93



handforiiely 'entertained them, in honour of thé king. They remained ft Angers, two days, and inquired where they could find the ford de Cliflbn, for they had a very courteous meflage to deliver to him from the ' king alone, who had or-dered them to fpeak with him. They replied,4 that they had not any pofitive intelligence where he was ; but they fuppofed he muft be in one of his caftles in Brittany : that he did not conftandy remain in any one, but moved from one to another! At their departure, the knights took leaye of the queen, her fon Charles, prince of Tarcntum, and John of Brittany, count de Penthievre, and continued their journey to Rennes. The duke of Brittany had fhut himfelf up with his duchefs in Vannes, without making any excurfions abroad for fear of ambufcades, and meeting his adverfary Cliflbn, as they were carrying on a murderous war againft each other. . When their parties mer, mercy was fhewn by neither, and the ' field was gained by the death of their opponents : if, there-fore, he felt alarmed, he had caufe for it; for, although the duke was fovereign of the country, there was not *a knight or fquire that would bear arms againft the ford de Cliflbn. They diflembled with die duke, faying, the quarrel did not any way concern them, and ftaid at home without interfering. This the duke was forced to put up with. When the knights arrived at Rennes, they afked where they could for certain find fir Oliver de Ciiffon, but no one could pofitively anfwer them. G j • They •8«


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