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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 100



m - how cruelly thou behavedft to me in the caftle of Ermine, near Vannes, when thou didft fbut-me up in a dungeon. Thou, Bernard, then hadft pity on me, and pulling off thy coat, hecaufe I was only in my doublet and lying on the pave-ment, gaveft it me, to cover me from the cold. x I % Will now return thatfriendfhip, by fparing thy life; ,but as for this wicked traitor, Yvonnet, who might have avoided, if he pleafed, the cruelty of his con-dud, he fhall fuffer.' At thefe words, he drew his dagger, and flew him on the (pot. He then con-tinued his courfe without touching the fervants. Another time, fir Oliver de Cliflbn, with about three hundred lances, was riding before the caftle of Auray, in which were the duke and duchefs. He met about forty of the duke's varices, who had tied their horfes to trees, for it was near Midr fummer, and, having cut fome hay, were truffing it up to carry, like foragers, to their lodgings. Sir Oliver galloped among them,, without other harm than the fright he put them to, and faid,—* € How dare you take the field, and carry away the harveft of the farmers ? You have not fown this, and are cutting it before it is ripe : you have be-gun your harveft too foon. Come take up your fcythes, and mount your horfes : for this time I 'will do you no harm j but go and tell the duke of Brittany, who I know, is in Auray, to come hither, ,or fend his men to receive me ; and that Clifton informs him he will remain here until fun-fet.' - - The varlets were happy in their efcape, for they thought they fhould all be killed, therefore they * \ picked


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