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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 198



At length, there was an end put to thcîr fufir-ings ; for the king, although he ' had confented to their imprifonmént, for reafons which had been given him, granted them his 0 pardon, deferring further inquiry into what had been laid to their charge until a future opportunity, and when he Ihould be more fully informed. All his lands and caftles were reftored to the lord de la Riviere, and, in the firft inftance, the beautiful caftle of Anneau, near Chartres, on the borders of Beauce ; but he was ordered thither, and never to recrofs the river Seine, unlefs recalled by the king's own mouth. Sir John le Mercier returned to his fine houfe of Noviant, of which he bore the title as lord, in the Laonnois -, and he had fimilar orders not to repafs the rivers Seine, Marne and Oife, unlefs fpecially commanded by the king. They alfo bound themfelves to go to whatever prifon they might hereafter be ordered by the king or by his commiflloners. The two lords thankfully accept-ed this grace, and wtre rejoiced to be delivered from the Châtelet. On gaining their liberty, they thought they fhould be allowed to fee the king, and thank him for his mercy, but it was not fo : they were forced to quit Paris inftantly, and ièt out for their different eftates. They, however, obtained their liberty, to the great joy of all who were at-tached to them. CHAP,


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