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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 217



In confcquence of this, the lord de Coney had pafTed through Savoy and Piedmont, with the cou-lent of the count de Savoyè and the Savoyards, accompanied by three hundred lances and five hundred crofs-bows. Having obtained leave from the duke of Milan, he continued his journey from Afti in Piedmont to a town called Alexandria, and thence to the frontiers of Genoa, to enter into ne-gotiations with the Genoefe, and learn mot£ plainly their intentions. By force he could do nothing* unlefs he were very fuperior to the Genoefe, which was not the cafe. When the lord dè Coucy had entered the terri-tories of Genoa, which are not eafy to conquer, if the inhabitants have any difpofitioa to defend them, fome of thofe lords who had fent the information to the duke of Orleans, and had. been the caufe of his coming, waifed on him, and with many friendly expreflions welcomed him to their country and of* fered him their caftles. But.the lord de Coucy was as prudent as valiant, and being weH acquaint-ed with the chara&er of the Lombards and Ge-noefe, was unwilling to1 truft too much to their offers and promifcs. However, he received them kindly, and treated them fairly by words; for al-though there were many conferences between them, they were held in the open fields, and not in any houfe or caftle ; but the more he negotiated the Ms hè gained. The Genoefe (hewed him every token of affec-tion, and invited him repeatedly to came to Genoa, or to Porto Venere, but the lord de Coucy VOL. XI. ' P would i©9


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