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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 229



Naples, Sicily and Jetufalem, on'condition to pay the fame to him in la Puglia % but, when he was in* formed of the king of Naples' death, he no longercon-tinued his journey but returned to France, making ufc of the above-mentioned fum to his own profit, without rendering any account of it to the queen of Naples, nor to her two children Lewis and Charles, but diffipating it in folly and extrava-gance. This was the caufe, as the queen of Naples faid, of the lofs of that kingdom, which was regained by Margaret Durazzo and the heirs of fir Charles Durazzo ; for the foldiers of her late lord, who were aiding her to continue the war in Calabria and la Puglia, deferred her for want of pay : many had turned to the count de St. Seve-rino and to Margaret Dtirastzo, and others had re-tired from the war. All thefe matters were pleaded in the courts of the parliament at Paris for upwards of three years : although fir Peter dc Crapn was abfent, his advo-cates defended him well. • They faid, that in re-gafd to the fum of one hundred thoufand francs which he was charged with having received in the name of the king of Naples, that king was • in-debted tô him as much, if not more, for the great and noble fervices he had rendered him. Notwithftanding the length of time this • caufe lafted, it was impoflible to put off for ever its conclufion ; and the lady was very urgent that judgment fhould be given by the parliament. The judges, having confidered the matter well, declared they would give no judgment until both - ' jparties 121 '


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