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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 252



Afer the death of Galeas, his fon John Gateas, Count dè Vertus, reigned with great power, and at the beginning was much beloved in Lombard y for Mi prudent and wife conduét. He abôlifhed • the moft opprefîive taxes his father had ifnpofed, and was fo popular that all fpoke well of him j but when he had fo fkr fucceeded,*he (hewed-his natu-ral difpofftion, which he had long restrained. He laid an ambufcade for his uncle, fir Befnabo, who thought himfelf on the beft terms with him ; and, when hç was taken, he was told that one lord was fùffiçient- for Lombardy. ' He could not obtain any favour, for the power was againft him, and, beihg carried to a caftlc, was put to death, but how t know not. Sir Bernabo had many fine children.$ aqd the queen of France is the daughter of one that' was married to the duke of Auftria and Bavaria. • Sir Galeas feifced all the children of his uncle he could lay hands on, as well as his poffeffiam, which he annexed to his own and reigned in great fpiendour 4md wealth. ;He (hardy after renewed the taxées he had taken off, ind extorted money from his r fubjefts, by every means of impofirion, which 'imade'- him more feared than loved; He followed^ ïhê errors of his Êthtr, declaring and maintaining, that he woiild never believe in, nor. adore God i in cohfequence, he deprived the - mo-nafteriesdf great part of their revenues, which he appropriated to hiniffcHV faying, the mernks livrd too delicately on fich food and choice; wines * that' fuch. fuperfluitiçs prevented them ri£»g at rinid- *; * . night


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