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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.11
page 298



the Chriftians, they were to fall back geritly to-wards', the main body, which was then to extend itfelf as much as poflible, and endeavour to cn-clofe the Chriftians, whom they fhould théri con-quer at pleafurc. Such was the order ôf battle of Bajazet. It happened* that on the Monday preceding Mi^ ehaelmas-day, in the year 1396, about ten o'clock, as the king of Hungary and the lords, who were lying before Nicopoli, were feated at dinner, news was brought them that their enemies, the Turks, were near at hand) but, as I heard, the fcouts did not inform them of the whole truth : they had not noticed the main body of the Turks, for the moment they faw the van-guard they dared not advance farther, as they were not men at arms fear-lefs of fuch ail enterprife. The Hungarians and French had each fdouts of their own, and both parties arrived nearly at the fame time with this in-telligence. The greater part of the army weir at dinner when the news was Carried to the count de Never* and the other French lords, the meflenger bawling out, * Come I quickly arm yourfelves, that you be not furprifed, for the Turks are on full march to meet you.* This information was agreeable to many wjio were defirous of arms : they inftafttly arofe, pufhed the tables afide, anddemanded their horfes and armour. They were fomewhat heated with wine, and haftcned to the field as well as they could. Banners and pennons were difpla^ed, under which every one ranged himfelf in his .proper poft. ' ' The 2§4


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