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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12

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Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12
page 54



undertook this bufinefs, he expe&ed to have been better Supported than he was by. the king. It was hinted to the king, by thofe near his perfon,— * Sire, you have no occafion to interfere further in this matter : diffemblc your thoughts, and leave them to themfelves : they are fully capable of managing it. The earl of Derby is wondrous popular in the kingdom, but more efpecially in London -, and, fhould the citizens perceive that you take part with the earl marfhal againft the earl of Derby, you will irrecoverably lofe their afFe&ion/ The king attended to this advice, for he knew it was true : in confequence, he difTembled his opinion, and fuffered each to provide for himfelf. The news of this combat between the earl of Derby and the earl marfhal made a great noifè in foreign parts : for it wa? to be for life or death, and before the king and great barons of England. It was fpoken of differently : fome faid, particu-larly in France,—c Let them fight it out : thefe Englifh knights are too arrogant, and in a fhort time will cut each other's throats. They are the xnoft perverfe nation under the fun, and their ifland is inhabited by the proudeft people/ But others, more wife, faid,—c • The king of England* does not fhew great fenfè, nor that he is well ad-vifed, when for foolifh words, undeferving ferious nonce, he permits two fuch valiant and noble lords, and of his kindred, thus to engage in mor- tal combat. He ought, .according to the opinions of many wife men, to have faid, when he firft heard


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