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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12

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Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12
page 67



you I and, when it fhall be your good pleafure, you will extend your mercy/ The lords prefent were fatisfied with the anfwer, and for this time were well pleafed with the king's behaviour, for he received them kindly. " Some of them returned with the earl of Derby to Lon-don. The earl's baggage had been fent forward to Dover, and he was advifed by his father, on his arrival at Calais, to go ftraight to Paris, and wait on the Mt?g of France and his coufins the princes of France, for by their means he would be the fooner enabled to fhôrten his exile than by any other. Had not the duke of Lancaftcr earneftly prefTed this matter, like a father anxious to con-sole his fon, he would have taken the direft road to the count d'Oftrcvaht in Hainault. The day the carl of Derby mounted his horfe to leave London, upwards of forty thoufand men were in the ftreets bitterly lamenting his departure : 1 Ah, gentle carl! will you then quit us ? This country will never be happy until your return, and the days until then will be infufFerably long. Through envy, treachery and fear are you driven out of a kingdom where you arc more worthy to refide than thofe who caufe it. You are of fuch high birth and, gallantry, that none others can be compared to you. Why then will you leave us, gentle earl ? You have never done wrong by thought or deed, and are incapable of fo doing.1 Thus did men and women fo piteoufly 'com-plain, that it was grievous to hear them. The eirl of Derby was not accompanied by trumpets, nor §0


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