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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12

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Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12
page 80



popç, on condition that you would çxcit yourfèlf In the reform of abufes in the church, and pro-mote an union, all of which you have ftrenuoufly promifed to do until this day. Anfwer for your-fdf, therefore, in â temperate manner, that wc may praife you, for you muft be better acquainted with your own mind and courage than we are/ Many of the cardinals fpoke at once, and faid; 4 Holy father, the cardinal of Amiens fpeaks well, and we beg of you to let us know your in-tentions." Upon this, Benedift replied,—c I have always had an eaj-neft defire for an union of the church, and have taken great pains to pro-mote it; but fince, through the grace of God, you have raifed me to the papacy, I will never refign it, nor fubmit myfelf to any king, duke or count, nor agree to any treaty that fhall in-çludç my refignation of the popedom/ The cardinals now all rofe, and there was much murmuring : fome faid he had well fpoken, and pthers the contrary; Thus was the conclave broken up in. difcord, and many of the cardi-nals departed to their hôtels without taking leave of the pope. Thofe who were in his good graces remained with him. When the • bifhop of Cambray obferved the ^manner in which the cardinals left the palace, he knew there had been great difagreement, and en-tering the hall of the conclave, advanced up to Benedict, who was ftfll on his throne, and, without much refpeft, faid,—c Sire, give me an anfwer : Ï cannot wait longer : for your council is , difmiffed.


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