Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12
page 85



diotigh belonging to Franee, and he, inrkh if € hundred combatants, guarded that fide of the town. The marfhal of France, with two thoufand men at arms, was on the oppofite fide : he fent nodce to the townfmen, that if they did not open their gates, and fubmit themfelves to his will, he would burn and deftroy all the houfes and vine-yards as far as the river Durance. This greatly difmayed the inhabitants of both fexes, who had their inheritances in that part of the country, and they called a council, to which they admitted the cardinals of Amiens, Poitiers, Neufchateau and Viviers, to have their advice. The townfmen, who were the moll intended in the marfhaPs me-nace, informed the meeting of their fears left he fhould execute it, faying it was made by orders from the king of France, whom diey were not ' prepared to refill, nor could they do fo with ef-fect, for he was too near a neighbour j and that, confidering all things, it would be much better to fubmit themfelves to the king of France than remain obftinate in the fupport of Benedict, who was unable to afford them any affiftance. They afked the cardinals if they would join them. * The cardinals faid they would. Provi-fions bqgan tct be fcarce in Avignon ; befides, their benefices were in France, which they would not lofe ; and they agreed with the townfmen in their treaty with the marfhal. The terms of the treaty were, that he and his army fhould be admitted into Avignon, to befiege the palace, but that no violence fhould be clone to the cardinals, their de-pendants,


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика