Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12
page 117



purfes, it was taken from them. The farmers/ houfes were pillaged of grain, and their beeves, pigs and fheep carried away, without the owners daring to fay a word. Thefc enormities increafed fo much, there was nothing but com-plaints heard. The common people faid ; ' Times are fadly changed for the worfe fince the days of king Edward of happy memory. Juftice was then rigorous in punifhing the wicked. Then ^there was no man in England daring enough to take a fowl or fheep without paying for them, but now they carry off all things, and .we muft not ^ fpeak. This cannot go on without the country being ruined, and yet no one attempts to check it. We have a good-for-nothing king, who only attends to his idle" pleafures j and, as it fhould feem, he cares not how public affairs are managed, fo that his inclinations are gratified. We muft look for a remedy, or our enemies and ill-wifticrs will be rejoiced and laugh at us. King Richard . has made his brother, the earl of Huntingdon, governor of Calais, and perchance there may be' fome underhand treaties going forward to furrender it to the French, although it be fo neceffary and convenient to England : fhould this happen no nation will be ever more difcomfited than the Englifh, and with good reafon, for they will lofe the keys of the entrance to France/ Thefe murmurings and difcontents multiplied i and the prelates and rich barons came to live in London, that they might avoid the troubles and dangers which were increafing throughout the kingdom* 110


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика