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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12

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Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12
page 177



lias been, brewed for you by the Londoners, who never loved you, and their diflike was fftiU m-creafed by your alliance with France. _ This mis-fortune is too great for us to bear. Ah, king Richard ! they have acknowleged you their fove-reign two and twenty years, and now they im-prifon you, and will put you to death ; for, fince they have crowned the duke of Lancafter king, that confequence muft follow/ Such were the lamentations of the townfmen of Bourdeaux, and that whole country $ and they con-tinued fo long the fénéfchal of Bourdeaux, a valiant and able Englifh knight, determined to fend home intelligence of thefe complaints in Bourdeaux, Dax and Bayonne, and that they were on the point of furrendering themfelvcs to the king of France. Having written and fealed his letters, he gave them to a trufty varlet,, whom he embarked on board a veffel ; and, having a favourable wind, he was landed in Cornwall, and thence purfued his journey to London, where king Henry at that time was holding his parliament. Thefe letters were addrefTed generally to the king and citizens of London, and, being opened and read, the king and his parliament confulted on them. The Lon-doners faid, like men no way difmayed,—Thofe of Bourdeaux and Bayonne will never turn to the French ; they cannot bear them ' nor fuffer their tricks. They are free under us ; but, if the French govern them, they.will*be taxed and taxed over again two or three times a-year. This they have not been accuftomed to, and will find it hard to endure. 170


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