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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.12
page 191



tnd advanced to Brentford, feyen miles from Lon-don, where they lay. Not one of the Londoners joined them, but fhut themfelvcs up in their town. When they faw this, they marched away towards Saint Albans, a large town, and there (laid one day. On the morrow, they went to Berk-hem p-ftead. They continued marching through different parts, publifhing every where that Magdalen was king Richard, and came to a ftrong town called Sonccftre *, which had a bailiff attached to king Henry for the guard of the town and defence of the adjacent-parts. The three earls and lord de Spencer took up their lodgings in Cirencefter, and were that night left quiet, for the bailiff, being a valiant and prudent man, did not think he was ftrong enough to combat them, and difïèmbkd his thoughts as well as he couldv • 1 The next morning the earl of Salisbury and lord de Spencer left the earl of Huntingdon and his ne-phew, faying they would advance farther into the country to gain friends, and would vifit the lord of Berkeley. They rode down Severn fide, but were badly advifed thus to feparate, for both parries were weakened by it. The earl of Huntingdon remained in Cirencefter, and attempted to tamper with the bailiff and townfmen. He told them that the Lon-doners had delivered king Richard out of prtfort, and within two dayshe would be there. The bailiff, having colktted a large force, faid that not one word was true ; for that he had juft heard the con-, trary from king Henry and the citizens of London • Sonceftre—Cirencefter, pronounced Cijeter. to 18*


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