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Roger De Hoveden The Annals vol.1., From A.D. 732 To A.D. 1180.

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Roger De Hoveden
The Annals vol.1., From A.D. 732 To A.D. 1180.
page 465



454 AXKAZS OF BOGEB BE HOVEDEN. A.D. 1177. Conyers the custody of the fortress of Durham, which the king had taken from Hugh, the bishop of Durham, because he had only made a feint of serving him in the civil wars. In consequence of this, the bishop gave him two thousand marks of silver to regain his favour, on condition that his castles should be left standing, and that the king should give to his son, Henry de Pudsey, his royal manor of Wighton, with its appurtenances. After this, the king went to Oxford, and, holding a general council there, created his son John king of Ireland, having a grant and confirmation thereof from Alexander, the Supreme Pontiff. To this council there also came, to meet the king, Rees, the son of Griffin,97 prince of South Wales, David, the son of Owen, prince of North Wales, who had married the sister of the said king of England, Cadewalan, prince of Delnain, Owen de Kevilian, Griffin de Brunfeld, and Madoc, the son of Gervetrog, together with many other of the noblemen of Wales, who all did homage to the king of England, the father, and swore fealty tj him against all men, and that they would maintain peace with Lim and with his kingdom. At the same council, also, our lord the king of England gave to the above-named Ilees, the son of Griffin, the land of Merioneth, and to David, the son of Owen, the land of Ellesmere. The king also gave to Hugh de Lacy, as above-mentioned, the whole of Meath, in Ireland, with its appurtenances, for the services of one hundred knights, to hold the same of himself and his son John, and confirmed the same to him by charter. He also there gave to Robert Fitz-Stephen and Milo de Cogham the kingdom of Cork, for the services of sixty knights, to hold the same of himself and of his son John, with the exception of the city of Cork and one cantred,98 which our lord the king reserved to himself and to his heirs. He also there gave to Hubert Fitz-Hubert, and to William, the brothers of earl Reginald, and to Jollan de la Primerai, their nephew, the kingdom of Limerick, for the services of sixty knights, to hold the same of himself and of his son John, with the exception of the city of Limerick and one cantred, which our lord the king reserved to himself and to his heirs. w a' Rice ap Griffyd. The British name for a hundred.


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