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Roger De Hoveden
The Annals vol.2., From A.D. 1180 To A.D. 1201.

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Roger De Hoveden
The Annals vol.2., From A.D. 1180 To A.D. 1201.
page 231



his men taking to flight, he entered London, and took refuge with his people in the Tower of London. Earl John, and nearly all the bishops and earls of England, also entered London on the same day, namely, the third day after the octave of Saint Michael, and, on the following day, the said earl John, the king's brother, and the archbishop of Eouen, and all the bishops, and the earls, and barons, met the citizens of London in Saint Paul's Churchyard, and there made accusation against the said chancellor of many offences, and especially the injuries he had done to the lord archbishop of York and the lord bishop of Durham. The associates also of the said chancellor whom the king had associated with him in the government of the kingdom, accused him of many offences, saying that, despising their advice, he had transacted all the affairs of the kingdom according to impulse and his own will. The archbishop of Rouen also, and William Marshal, earl of Striguil, then for the first time produced before the people the sealed letters from our lord the king, in which the king had sent orders from Messina that they should be associated with him in the government of the kingdom, and that, without the advice of them and the other persons so appointed, he was not to act in the affairs of the king and the kingdom, and that if he should do anything to the detriment of the kingdom, or without the consent of the persons beforenamed, he should be deposed, and the archbishop of Rouen substituted in his place. It seemed good therefore to John, the king's brother, and all the bishops, earls, and barons of the kingdom, and to the citizens of London, that the chancellor should be deposed, and they accordingly deposed him, and substituted in his place the archbishop of Rouen, who was willing to do nothing in the government of the kingdom except with the will and consent of the persons assigned to him as associates therein, and with the sanction of the barons of the exchequer. On the same day, also, the earl of Mortaigne, the archbishop of Rouen, and the other justiciaries of the king, granted to the citizens of London the privilege of their commonalty; and, during the same year, the earl of Mortaigne, the archbishop of Rouen, and the other justiciaries of the king, made oath that they would solemnly and inviolably observe the said privilege, so long as the same should please their lord the king. The citizens of London also made oath that they would faithfully serve their lord


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