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FRANCIS LANCELOTT, ESQ. Queens of England. Vol.1.

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FRANCIS LANCELOTT, ESQ.
Queens of England. Vol.1.
page 493



nate and obdurate woman, deserving- the reward of malice in the extremity of mischief, I dare not open my lips to mention you, unless I have ground to make it appear that you have repented of your miserable ingratitude and unkindness. Therefore I have sent you a book of articles, whereunto if you set your hand and subscribe your name, you will undoubtedly please God ; and upon the receipt thereof again from you with a letter, declaring that yon think in heart what you have subscribed with hand, I shall, cftsoons, venture to speak for your reconciliation. Eut if you will not leave off your sinister councils, which have brought you to the point of utter undoing, 1 take my leave of you for ever, as the most ungrateful, unnatural, and obstinate of women, both to God and to your dear and benign father, the King. I advise you to nothing but what I know to be your bounden duty, and if you do it not, you will render yourself unfit to live in a Christian congregation, of which I am so convinced that I refuse the mercy of Christ if it is not true." This extraordinary epistle obtained for Cromwell a triumph he had sought with such consummate finesse, that his real purpose, that of securing the succession to the sister of his own son's wife, was alike hid from the King and his already half-forgiven daughter. Intimidated and confounded, ill in body and harassed in mind, the persecuted Princess again made a desperate effort, and this time succeeded in swallowing the bitter pill. She signed what Cromwell was pleased to name the book of articles, which we hero subjoin, as a memento of that minister's craft and selfishness, of Henry the Eighth's paternal tyranny, and of Mary's moral weakness. " The confession of me, tho Lady Mary, made upon certain points and articles under-written, in the which, as I do now plainly and with, all mine heart confess and declare mineinward sentence, belief, and judgment, with a due conformity of obedience to the laws of the realm, so minding for ever to persist and continue in this determination, without change, alteration, or variance, I do most humbly beseech the King's Highness, my father, whom I have obstinately and inobediently offended in the denial of the same, heretofore to forgive mine offences therein, and to take me to bis most gracious mercy. " First, I confess and acknowledge the King's Majesty to be my sovereign Lord and King, in the imperial crown of this realm of England, and do submit myself to his Highness, and to all and singular laws and statutes of this realm, as becometh a true and faithful subject, to do which, I shall also obey, keep, observe, advance, and maintain, according to my bounden duty, with all tho power, force, and qualities that God hath endued me with during my life, " MAJIY." " Item, I do recognize, accept, take, repute, and acknowledge the King's Highness to be supreme head in earth under Christ of the Church of England ; and do utterly refuse the Bishop of Pome's pretended authority, power, and jurisdiction, within this realm, heretofore usurped according to the laws and statutes made in that behalf, and of all the King's true subjects, humbly received, admitted, obeyed, kept, and observed ; and also do utterly renounce and forsake all manner of remedy, interest, and advantage, which I may by any means claim by the Bishop of Pome's laws, process, jurisdiction, or sentence, at this present time or in anywise hereafter, by any manner of title, colour, mean, or case, that is, shall, or can be devised for that purpose. " M ARY." "Item, I do freely, frankly, and for the discharge of my duty towards God, the King's Highness, and his laws, without other respect, recognize and acknowledge that tbo marriage heretofore had between his Majesty and my mother, tho late Princess Dowager, was, by God's law and man's law, incestuous and unlawful. " M ARY." Before heaping a wholesale blame on Mary for signing these degrading arti


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