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ROGER OF WENDOVER Flowers of history. The history of England from the descent of the saxons to A.D. 1235. vol.2

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ROGER OF WENDOVER
Flowers of history. The history of England from the descent of the saxons to A.D. 1235. vol.2
page 365



,364 P.OC.I.R OF WKXPOVER. [A.D . 1Q1G if you shoulil by chance full into thr hands of Kustace tin1 monk, or any otbi'r of Louis's frioiuls who ar o in charge of the seas, ilo not blame ni e ibr anything untoward that befalls you." On this, the legate, departed from the court in a rage. Hole Louis obtained his father's permission, and treat to ICngland. On the following day. which was that of St. Mark the evangelist, Louis went to bis father at Meluu, and begged of him not to obstruct his proposed journey; he also added that he had given his oath to the barons of Kngland that he would come to their assistance, and therefore, he would rather be excommunicated by the pope for a time, than incur the charge of'falsehood. The king, seeing the firmness and anxiety of his sou, granted him his permission, and dismissed him with his blessing. Louis then sent messengers to the court of Koine, there to set forth in the presence of the pope the right which he claimed for himself to the kingdom of Kngland, and then, in company with his earls, barons, knights, and numerous followers, he made all baste to the sea-coast, that he might reach Kngland before the legate. When they all reached the port of Calais, they found there six hundred ships and eighty cogs, all well equipped, which Kustace the monk had collected then.' against Louis's arrival; they therefore all immediately embarked and put to sea with all sliced, making for the isle of Thanet, where they landed at a place called Stanhore, on the twenty-first of .May. King John was then at Dover with his army, but as he was surrounded with foreign mercenaries and knights from the transmarine provinces, be did nor venture to attack Louis on his lauding, lest in the battle they might all leave him and go over to the side of Louis : he therefore chose to retreat tor a time, rather than to give battle o n an uncertainty. Me therefore retreated before Louis, leaving Dover castle in charge o f Hugh de Burgh, and continued his Might till he arrived first at Guildford, and afterwards at Winchester. Louis, finding n o one to oppose him, disembarked at Sandwich, and soon subdued the whole of the district, with the exception of the castle of Dover, lie then went to London, and was there received with great joy by all the barons ; he then received homage and fealty from all of them, and from


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