Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

CHARLES J. ROSEBAULT. Saladin. Prince of Chivalry

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

CHARLES J. ROSEBAULT.
Saladin. Prince of Chivalry
page 243



But Reginald did not go back to his own bed that night. Treated always with the same consideration, it was impressed upon him that the Sultan could not allow him to leave, and had ordered a tent of honor to be erected adjoining his own, as there would be need of further discussions. In fact, there were quite a few interviews, enough to take up all the waning time to the exact moment when the surrender of the city was due, fdr Saladin was always meticulous about keeping his word to the letter, and then a final talk, when he threw off all further pretense and demanded immediate fulfillment of Reginald's promise. When the latter sought to evade again, Saladin interrupted sharply : "You always meant to deceive us. You have repaired your fortress and introduced fresh supplies." If Reginald was stumped he did not show it. On the contrary. Challenging the correctness of the Sultan's accusation, he asked that two trustworthy men be sent to inspect the walls, each of them to appoint one, and report upon their present condition. At the same time they would receive the surrender of the fortress. One cannot but marvel at the cool impudence of the proposal, for, of course, both men came back with the report that repairs had been made and their demand for surrender refused. Was Reginald finally confounded and made to confess his duplicity? Not at all. He simply kept on playing the game with the same appearance of sincerity. Denied the usual entree to the Sultan, he made a great


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика