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CHARLES G. ADDISON, ESQ. The history of the Knights Templars, Temple Church, and the Temple

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CHARLES G. ADDISON, ESQ.
The history of the Knights Templars, Temple Church, and the Temple
page 34



must be so coloured, that its splendour and beauty may not impart to the wearer an appearance of arrogance beyond his fellows. " XL. Bags and trunks, with locks and keys, are not granted, nor can any one have them without the license of the Master, or of him to whom the business of the house is intrusted after the Master. In this regula tion, however, the procurators (preceptors) governing in the different pro vinces are not understood to be included, nor the Master himself. " XLI. It is in nowise lawful for any of the brothers toreceive letters from his parents, or from any man, or to send letters, without the license of the Master, or of the procurator. After the brother shall have had leave, they must be read in the presence of the Master, if it so pleaseth him. If, indeed, anything whatever shall have been directed to him from his parents, let him not presume to receive it until information has been first given to the Master. But in this regulation the Master and the procurators of the houses are not included. " XLII. Since every idle word is known to beget sin, what can those who boast of their own faults say before the sbïct Judge ? The prophet showeth wisely, that if we ought sometimes to be silent, and to refrain from good discourse for the sake of silence, how much the rather shoidd we refrain from evil words, on account of the punishment of sin. We forbid therefore, and we resolutely condemn, all talcs related by any brother, of the follies and irregularities of which he hath been guilty in the world, or in military matters, either with his brother or with any other man. It shall not be permitted him to speak with his brother of the irregularities of other men, nor of the delights of the flesh with miserable women ; and if by chance he should hear another discoursing of such things, he shall make him silent, or with the swift foot of obedience he shall depart from him as soon as he is able, and shall lend not the ear of the heart to the vender of idle tales. " XL1II. If any gift shall be made to a brother, let it be taken to the Master or the treasurer. If, indeed, his friend or bis parent will consent to make the gift only on condition that he useth it himself, he must not receive it until permission hath been obtained from the Master. And who


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