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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 338



In another part, the lord John Clênftéïft/&ughl under his banner, as long as he was able ? but, be* ing ftrutik down, he could neither get up 'again rior procure his ranfom : he was killed on* ihe fp'ot. • Some fay, this treatment was owing to his alterca-tion os the preceding day with fir John Chaftdos. • • In a ft eft time, this battalion of the tnarfliàl& \vaà totally difcorafted ; for Ibey fell'back fo much m each other, that the army could ttôt advance, and thofe who were in the rear; not being* able to gel. forward, fell back upon the battalion tommamfea by the duke of Ttforuiahdy, which wds -Tftoad1 an$ thick ib the front, but it was fbon thm-énoligli ÎA thé rear; for, when they learnt that ¥hè mkrfhfeli had beefi defeated, they mounted thfeir- horfes'arid fet off. At this tkne, a body of Englilh came down. frcn* the hill, and, paffing along the Battalions oft famfèbàck, accompanied by a large body bf archers, Ml upon one of the wings of the duké of Nor-mandy's divifion. To fhy the truth,1 the 'Englifh archers were of infinite fervice to their army ; for they fttot fo thickly and fo well, that the ï'rëtièft «Rd not know which way to turn themfelves, to avoid their arrows : by this means ' they kept ad-vancing by little and little, and gained ground. When the men at arms perceived that the firft battalion Was beaten, and that the oiiè trtfder the duke of Normandy was in drforder, ' and beginning to open^they haftened to mount their librfes, which they had, ready prepared, clofe at hand. As fooo as they were all • mounted, they^ gave la fhout of Y 2 ( St. 228


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