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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 258



Ing feveral friends ; and I will bring back with me as many as I poflibly can/ € By my faith,* replied king Henry, c you fay well ; and I will, in this bufinefs, follow every thing you fhall order/ ' Not long after, fir Bertrand took leave of king Henry, and went to Arragon, where he was re-ceived with'joy by the king ; with whom he re-mained fifteen days, and then departed. He conti-nued his journey to Montpellier, where he found the duke of Anjou, who was very happy to fee him, as he loved him much. When he had paffed fome time there, he took his leave, and went to France, where he had a moft gracious reception, from the king. ' When it was publicly known through Spam, Ar-ragon and France, that the intentions of the prince of Wales were to replace dan Pedro in the king-dom of Caftille, it was a matter of great wonder to * many, and was varioufly talked of. Some faid, the prince was making this expedition through pride and prefumption ; that he was jealous of the honor fir Bertrand du Guefclin had obtained, in conquer-ing Caftille in the name of king Henry, and then making him king of it. Others faid, that both •pity and juftice moved him to affift don Pedro in re-covering his inheritance ; for it was highly unbé-. comirfg a baftard to hold a kingdom, or bear the :nmme of king. Thus were many knights and * fquires divided in their ppinions. ... King Henry, however, was not idle : he fent am-baffadors to the king of Arragon, to entreat of him that he would not enter into any treaty or conven-tion Hi


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