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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 76



quence, broke up their quarters, both Spaniards • ' and French, and followed the banners of don John of Caftille, who encamped two ihort leagues from Badajos, in the plains of Elvas. The king of Spain had in his army upwards-of thirty thoufand fighting men, including thofe mounted on genets : they were in the whole fix-ty thoufand. In this fituation, the two armies re-mained oppofite to each other. There was only between them the mountain of Badajos, which is a large town belonging to the king of Spain, • and where his men went whenever they were in want of provifion. The city of Elvas was on the oppofite fide, and belonged to the king of Portugal. On the plain there were daily fkirmifhes ; for thé young bachelors who were defirous to advance themfelves went thither, when fome gallant feats were continually performed*: they then returned • to their quarters. Things remained in this ftate for upwards of fifteeh days $ and it was not any fault m the king of Spain that the combat did not take place, for it depended folely on the king of Portugal, who, not being in fufficient force to " meet the Spaniards, was afraid of the event. He well knew, that if he were defeated* his^ kingdom would be loft, and that whole feafon he had been ' expecting the duke of Lancafter, with the great aid he was to bring him from England of four thou-fand men at arms and the fame number of archers. The earl of Cambridge had affured the king of Portugal, that he might depend on thfe, and thought nothing could prevent it ; rfor the duke . - ». of 62


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