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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 77



of Lancafter, when he was fetting out for Scot" land, had fworn to him by his faith, that on his return, he would think of nothing elfe, and would inftantly come to Portugal with fuch m army as fhould enable him to engage with the king of Caftille. True it is, that the duke of Lancafter did every thing in his power to prevail on the king and his council to Men to this bufinefs; but on account of the internal troubles which had hap-pened this year, and fome events which had fallen out in Flanders, the king and his council would not confent to this expedition to Portu-gal, fo that all the men at arms were detained in England. When the king of Portugal heard this, and found that he muft not expect any fuccours from England, he began to open a treaty : the grand matter ofCalatrava, don Pedro de Modesque, the bifhop of Burgos and the bifliop of Lifbon, en-tered into negotiations for peace between Portu-gal and Spain. Thefe were carried on fo fuc-cefsfully, that peace was made, without any no-tice being taken of the Englifli. The earl of Cam-bridge was very melancholy on learning this news, and would willingly have made war on the king of Portugal, if he had been ftrong enough in the country; but he was not: he was therefore obliged to endure this peace whether he would or not. The Englifli complained that the king of Por-tugal had behaved ill to them, from the beginning to the end, and that he had always diffembled with the Spaniards, for he had never had any in-clination 6S


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