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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 26



becomes us to wait patiently, and to fpeak fair, fince we are got into fuch difficulties. We have a long way yet to go, and we cannot return through England. . Take in good humour what-ever you can get. You cannot always be at Paris* Dijon, Beauné or Chalons: it is neceffary for thofe who wifh to live with honour in this world to endure good and evil.' • By fuch words as thefe, and others which I do not remember, did Sir John de Vienne pacify his ' army in Scotland. Hemade as itauch acquaintance as he could with the fcottifli barony and knights : but he was vifited by fo very few it is not worth fpeaking of; for, as I have faid before, there is not much honour there, and they are people dif-ficult to be acquainted with. The earls of Douglas and Moray were the principal vifitants to the lords of France. Thefe two lords paid them more attention than all the reft of Scot-land. But this was not the worft, for the French were hardly dealt with in their purchafes; and whenever they wanted to buy horfes, they were ailed, for what was worth only ten florins, fixty and a hundred: with difficulty could they be found at that price. When the horfe had been bought there was no furniture nor any houf-ings to be met with, unlefs the refpective ar-ticles had been brought with them from Flanders. In this fituation were the French : befides^ when-ever their fervants went out to forage, they .were indeed permitted to load their horfes with as much àsf they could pack up and carry, but they were %ay-laid on their return, and villanoufly beaten, robbed, 16


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