Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 88



Sç.ote were willing that a few poor knights who had no .great command {hould leave the country, that they might the eafier govern the reft. They told the barons of France c that their dependants, when they pleafed, might départ, but that they themfelves fhould not quit the country until they had made fatisfaction for the fums that had been expended for the ufe of their army.' This declaration was very difagreeable to fir John de Vienne and the other French barons. The earls of Douglas and Moray, who pretended to be exafperated at the harfli conduct of their countrymen, remon fixated with them, that they did not act becoming men at arms, nor as friends to the kingdom of France, by this behaviour to its knights : and that henceforward no Scots knight would daré to fet his foot in France. Thefe two earls, who were friendly enough to the French barons, pointed out the probable effect their conduct would have on their vaffals; but fome replied, ' Do diffemble with them, for you have loft as much as wc/ They therefore told the admiral, they could not do anything for him : and, if they were fo anxious about quitting Scot-land, they muft confent to make good their da-mages. The admiral feeing nothing better could be clone, and unwilling to lofe all, for he found him-felf very uncomfortable, fur rounded by the fea, and the Scots of a very favagê difpofition, ac-ceded to their propôfals, and had proclaimed through the realm, that all thofe whom hi? peo-ple had injured, and who cou M flievv juft'caufe ' ' ' " ' ...... . -/ ' fov 78-


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика