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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 137



'ÏÛ7 'As soon as he was informed of • the arrival of the prince and princess at Tarbes, he made his preparations and visited them in great state, ac-companied by upwards of six hundred horse and sixty knights. They were much pleased at his visit, and entertained him handsomely, as he was well deserving of it, and the princess paid him . the most engaging attentions. The count d'Ar-magnac and the lord d'Albreth were present, and the prince was entreated to request the count de Foix to release the count from ail, or part of what he was indebted to him for his ransom. The prince being a prudent as well as a valiant man, having considered a while, said, he would not do so, and added ; c Count d'Armagnac, you were made prisoner by fair deeds of arms, and in open battle : you put our cousin the count de Foix, his person and his men, to the hazard of the fight, and, if fortune has been favour-able to him and adverse to you, he ought not to fare the worse for it. Neither my lord and father nor myself would have thanked you if you had entreated us to give back what we had honour-ably and fortunately won at the battle of Poi-tiers, for which we return thanks to the Lond God/ The count d'Armagnac, on hearing this, was quite thunderstruck : and, notwithstanding be had failed in his expectations,, he made a similar request to the princess, who cheerfully entreated 4^he count de Foix to grant her a boon, c Madam,' replied the count, * I am but a small gentle-man,


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