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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 210



too king, c will you do what I am about to tell you ? You see how unjuftly the count de Foix hates your mother, who being my filler, itdifpleafes me as much as it fhould you. If you wifh to recon-cile your father to your mother, you muft take a small pinch of this powder, and when you see a proper opportunity, ftrew it over the meat des-tined for your father's table; but take care no one fees you. The inftant he fhall have tailed it, he will be impatient for his wife, your mother, to return to him ; and they will love each other henceforward fo ftrongly they will never again be feparated. You ought to be anxious to fee this accomplifhed. Do not tell it to any one : for, if you do, it will lofe its effect/ The youth, who believed every thing his uncle the king of Navarre had told him, replied, he would cheerfully do as he had said; and on this he departed from Pam-peluna, on his return to Orthès. His father the ' count de Foix received him with pleafure, and alked what was the news in Navarre, and what prefents and jewels had been given him : he re-plied, s Very handfome ones,' and Ihewed them all, except the bag which contained the powder. c It was cuftomary, in the hôtel de Foix, for Gallon and his baftard brother Evan to fleep in the fame chamber : they mutually loved each other and were dreffed alike, for they were nearly of the fame fize and age. It fell out, that their clothes were once mixed together; and, the coat if Gallon being oft the bed, Evan, who was ma-licious enough* noticing the powder in the bag, • ' faid


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