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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 250



agakft.the duke under his name* It was there faid,—4 Sir John de Montfort knows well that he owes his duchy folely to us, for without cur aid he never could have gained it; and a pretty return he has made us, by wearing our army down with fatigue and famine, and fruitlefsly expending our treafure. Wé mud make him feel for his ingrate tude ; and we cannot better revenge ourfelves than by fetting his rival at liberty, and landing him in that country, where the towns and cailles will open their gates to him, and expel the other who has thus deceived .us/ i . This refolution was unariimoufly adopted* John of Brittany was brought before the council, ahd told they would give him his liberty, regain for him the duchy of Brittany, and marry him to the lady Philippa of Lancafter, on condition that Brittany fhould be held as a fief from England, and that he •would do the king homage for it. He refufed compliance with thefe terms. He would, indeed, have accepted the lady, but peremptorily refufed to enter into any engagements inimical to France, were he to remain prifoner alt his days. The council, hearing this, grew cool in their offers of freedom, and replaced him under the guard of fir Thomas d'Am-breticotirt* This I have already related, but I now return to it, on account of the event which hap* pened in Brittany, as being the confequence ; for the duke, well aware he was in difgrace with all England, was greatly alarmed at the dangers that - might enfue, from the treatment the earl of Buck-ingham and his army were forced to put up with, • . from


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