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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 251



•hè from the breach of all his englgeaieftts. if either the kilig of England nor his uncles longer wrote him fuch friendly tetters as they were ufed to do before the earl of Buckingham's expedition. His alarms ft ere much increafed whei he Heard that John of Brittany was retufned from England, and faid, the Englifh had given hini his liberty in rei wage for his late conduâ. The duke upon this determined, by one bolÉ Iroke, to recover the favour of England; and to do it fo fetretly and opportunely that the Englifh fhould thank him He knew thëfe was iitft a man on êfcrth whom they more hated and dreaded • than fir Oliver de ClifTon, Conftable^ of France; for, in truth, his thoughts were daily and nightly employed oh the means to injure England. He was the pro-pofer of the late great armament at Sluys, and the chief direftor of thofe carried oh at Trfegtfier and Marieur. The dukef therefore, to pleafe the Eng-fifh, and to fhew he had not much dépendance cut? nor lové for the French, refolved to prevent the in-tended invafion of England taking effeft : not, deed, by forbidding his fubje&s to join in this at-tack on England, under pain of forfeiting their lands, for that would have too clearly drfcofcered the fide to which he leaned. He went to wofk more fecretly, and thought he could hot aéfc more to hit advantage than to arreft the conftable, été ptttMiE to death, for which the Englifh would thank hiàl; ' as they hated him much. He was not afraid of'IBs family, as it was not powerful enough to make war againft him; for he had but two daughters, one married


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