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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 255



rode through Brabant night and day ; fo that he came into Hainault, and entered the wood of Blaton, before any of his followers knew where and why they were thus haftening : he then told fome of his intimates, that he had made a promife in England, before the nobles and ladies, that he / would be thefirft that would enter France, and take fome caftle orftrong town, and perform fome gallant deed of arms ; and that his intention was to pufh forward as far as Mortaigne, to furprize the town, which was a part of the kingdom of France; Thofe to whom he thus opened himfelf cheerfully confented to follow him. They then regirthed their horfes,tightened their armour, and rode in clofe order : having paiTed through the wood of Blaton, they came at one ftretch, a little before funrife, to Montaigne, where luckily they found the wiqket open. Sir Walter alighted with fome of his companions, and having paffed the wicket infilence, and placed there a guard, he then with his pennon marched down theftreet before the great tower, but the gate and the wicket were clcfe ihut. . The watch of the caftle heard their voice, and feeing them from his poft, began to blow his horn, and to cry out 'Treafon! treafon!* This awakened the foldiers and inhabitants, but they did not make any fallyfrom the fort. Sir Walter, upon this, retreated handfomely into theftreet, and ordered thofe hpufes to be fet on fire that were near the caftle: full fifty houfes were burnt that morning, and the inhabitants much frightened, as they concluded they muft all have beeu


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