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SALAMIS

SALAMIS IN THE ISLAND OF CYPRUS.
BY ALEXANDER PALMA DI CESNOLÀ, F.S.A.,
page 17

 

LIST OF CHAPTERS

I. Salamis
II. General Idea op Cypriote Antiquities
III. Gold Objects — Frontals, Necklaces, Hairpins, Ear-rings Finger-rings, Nondescript Objects, and Parts of Personal Ornaments
IV. Silver Objects
V. Bronze and Iron Remains—Patera, Mirrors, Boxes, Rings Armour, Miscellaneous Objects
VI. Leaden Antiquities—Groups, Plates, Slings, Bullets, Boxes Inscribed Rolls, Seals or Stamps
VII. Ivory Objects — Seals or Rings, Carvings, Boxes, Spoons Articles for the Toilet, etc
VIII. Bone and Shell Antiquities
IX. Stone Antiquities—Inscribed Stones, Phœnician Numerals, Cypriote Inscriptions, Statuettes, Greek Inscriptions, Altars, Vases, Amulets, Stamps, Tympanum of Early Christian Work
X. Alabaster
XI. Serpentine and Crystal Antiquities
XII. Cylinders
XIII. Cones
XIV. Scarabǽi.—Beads.—Inlaying Pieces, etc.
XV. Engraved Gems and Precious Stones
XVI. Chalcedony, etc.
XVII. Glass—Number of Specimens, Paterœ, Acetabula, Hand-painted Vases, Painted Dishes, Finger-rings, Hairpins, Unguentaria, Alabastra, Ainphorœ, Diotse, Oinochoœ, Hydriœ, Iridescent Glass, Bowls, Pendants, etc.
XVIII. Terra-Cotta—Statues and Statuettes, Portraits, Grotesques, Caricatures, Figures of Boys
XIX. Terra-Cotta (continued)—Sacerdotal and Sacred Effigies
XX. Terra Cotta (continued) — Masks, Caricatures, Animals, Chariots, Warriors, Toys, and other Objects
XXI. Terra-Cotta (continued) — Urns, Vases, Amphorǽ, Archaic, Aryballi, Fumigators, Hand or Foot Warmers, Strainers, Pots, Later Aryballi, Miscellaneous, Roman, etc.
XXII. Lamps
XXIII. Coins

CHAPTER I.
SALAMIS.

HE rains of the ancient city of Salamis1 in the island of Cyprus are distant about one hour's journey from the shore, and about a quarter of an hour's journey from the remaining vestiges of the ancient and celebrated harbour of Salamis, which has now almost wholly disappeared beneath the shingle thrown up by the sea. It is situated in the middle of the eastern coast of the island, somewhat north of the river Pediams.2 The powerful agency of earthquakes—frequent in the island—may also account in some measure for the subsidence of the ancient buildings. 1 This site must not be confounded with the island of Salamis off the West Coast of Attica, from which it is separated by a narrow channel. This is said to have been called Salamis from the name of a daughter of Asopus, a Greek River God. It was colonized at an early period by the Æacidæ of Ægina. Telamon, son of Æacus, fled thither after murdering his half-brother Phocus, and obtained possession of the island. The old city of Salamis, which gives its name to the new Salamis in Cyprus, stood on the south side of the island opposite Ægina; but this was afterwards deserted, and a new city of the same name built on the east coast, opposite Attica. Salamis is

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